Expat Brokerage Options

A common question that I get from my friends who are teaching English abroad is what brokerage I use to invest in the stock market. It can be quite complicated and a brokerage in your home country might not necessarily be the best choice for tax-related reasons. Andrew Hallam and Expat Brokerage Options The best information out there on this topic is from Andrew Hallam, in The Global Expatriate’s Guide to Investing: From Millionaire Teacher…

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Money Means Choices

Money Diet March has been in full force this past week and I’ve discovered that I am not actually the queen of frugal that I thought I was. Perhaps that ship has sailed and since I’ve paid off all my debt, have a fat stack of cash in various bank accounts around the world and significant investments, I’ve gotten out of the hard-core frugal lifestyle that I lived while I still had student loans. I’m…

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Top 10 Life Lessons I’ve Learned while Living Abroad

I’m coming up on my 10th year anniversary of living in Korea and along the way, I’ve learned a lot about myself, life and finances. I’m sure I would have learned these things, eventually while living in my home country just as a result of getting older and wiser, but I think there’s something about leaving everything familiar that can speed this process up. Top 10 Life Lesson I’ve Learned while Living Abroad 1. People…

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What I’m Buying: VDY (Canadian High Dividend Yield ETF)

The problem that’s not really a problem I’ve talked a bit about how I’ve been sitting on almost $10,000 of cash, waiting for the market to crash so I can buy. I actually like to have all my cash invested, along with around $30,000 on the margin, so that was $40,000 I didn’t have put to good use. Now, I do realize that having too much cash isn’t really a real problem, but it was…

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Money Diet Challenge: Top 5 Tips

And so it Begins The money diet is starting tomorrow and although it’s been a few years since I’ve gone on a diet, I’m super excited for this challenge. In years gone by, I’ve totally kicked butt at money diet challenges and don’t think I’ve ever lost one. Here are my secrets and even though they’re secrets I’m going to share with you because I want to help my readers be as awesome as they…

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The Wealthy English Teacher: Samples from the Book

My second book, The Wealthy English Teacher is hot off the press and now available on Amazon in both digital and print formats. Initial sales have been promising with more than 20 copies sold in just a couple of days with no paid advertising. I’m hoping that people will really like it and tell their friends-there really is no other financial book (or even resource on the Internet) that is specifically for ESL teachers. If…

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Money Diet Challenge

One of my Biggest Fears I’ll be leaving my home for the last 10 years, Korea and going to Canada in about a year from now. In preparation for this move, I’ve been officially on money-spending lock-down and am all about the frugal living, even more than I was previously. There is truly nothing scarier to me than arriving in Canada with basically nothing more than what I can fit in 2 suitcases, nowhere to…

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Too late to Start Saving for Retirement?

It’s never too late to start planning for retirement You might be reading this post when you are in your late forties, fifties or even sixties and thinking that your financial landscape is pretty bleak. You are perhaps thinking about if it is too late to start saving for retirement. Perhaps you have lots of debt, including credit cards, no emergency fund and nothing in the way of retirement savings or other assets such as…

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Plan Your Day

My Sweet University Job in Korea I’m pretty fortunate working at a university in South Korea in that I get quite literally months of vacation. And even during the semester, I quite rarely work 5 days/week, so that leaves me with a lot of days in the year where there is nothing that I have to do. I just did a quick calculation and in any given year, I have about 240 days that are…

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The Wealthy English Teacher- Available on Amazon

 The Wealthy English Teacher: Teach, Travel, and Secure your Financial Future is now available on Amazon. It has a much bigger potential audience than my most nichiest of niche first book about how to get a university job in South Korea. I’m hoping that it’s the type of book that people really like, and tell their friends about, who in turn tell a few other people. So far, I’ve sold a decent amount of copies in…

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Personal Finance Rules: Build Strong Relationships

Inspired by The Simple Dollar, I’m doing a series on personal finance rules and have previously talked about: Spend Less Than You Earn, Keep it Simple Stupid, Pay Per Hour Worked, and Ignore Professional Stock Pickers. Today is how you (and me too) should build strong relationships. Over at The Simple Dollar it is rule #19 and they offer some helpful reasons why you would want to do this.  I’ll add my own thoughts to…

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Top 3 Reasons to Ignore Professional Stock Pickers

I continue on with a series on personal finance rules inspired by this post over at The Simple Dollar. The first three parts in this series were: Keep It Simple Stupid, Spend Less Than You Earn, and Pay Per Hour Worked in case you missed them. Today, some good advice from The Simple Dollar, which is to ignore professional stock pickers. You know, the ones you see on TV (Jim Cramer at Mad Money) and…

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Pay Per Hour Worked

Today I’m continuing with my series on personal finance tips, inspired by this post over at The Simple Dollar: 60 Simple Rules of Personal Finance. I’ve already talked about keeping it simple and spending less than you earn. Today, it’s all about knowing what your pay per hour worked is. This has been on my mind lately for 2 reasons: 1. I’m writing a book called, “The Wealthy English Teacher” and there’s a chapter about…

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Top 5 Ways to: Keep it Simple, Stupid

Inspired by a post, 60 Rules of Personal Finance over at The Simple Dollar, I’m continuing my own series of personal finance rules to live by. The first rule I talked about was: “Spend Less Than You Earn” and this one is, “Keep It Simple, Stupid” (the KISS principle).  Here are my top 5 ways to do that: 1. Automate Bills and Investments. Paying the bills and contributing money to retirement and savings accounts can…

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Spend Less Than You Earn

I ran across this article, 60 Simple Rules of Personal Finance over at The Simple Dollar the other day and thought I would do a series, talking about some of my favorite points. Spend Less Than You Earn This is probably my favorite personal finance tip of all time and if you do only this, and nothing else for your entire life, you’ll probably retire rich, or at least comfortably. I’m currently writing a book…

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Depending on the Government in Retirement: a Good Option?

Depending on the government in retirement might not seem like a terrible plan because you can just work, enjoy your life, spend your money freely and then get your retirement taken care of. No sacrifice, or giving up any fun required! English Teacher’s Precarious Situation I’ve been thinking about the question of when is too late to start saving for retirement as I’ve been writing my book about personal finance for English teachers. I think…

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What about Investing in Gold and Silver?

My Old Coworker’s Obsession I remember a few years ago when I worked with a couple guys who were obsessed with buying gold and silver. They were totally and completely convinced that stockpiling these two assets, physically was the best way to put their hard-earned dollars to work. I remember thinking that this seemed like a complicated endeavor because you had to go buy the product and hope you were not getting ripped off, then you…

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Is Insurance Necessary?

Of course there are times when insurance is necessary like it you have a car, but other times it’s a lot more ambiguous and really depends on individual circumstances. I’ll talk about 2 kinds of insurance (supplementary health insurance and life insurance) where it really depends on your individual circumstances whether you’d need them or not. Supplementary Health Insurance For the sake of simplicity, I’m going to assume that we’re not talking about the USA,…

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An Emergency Fund is Necessary

This topic is especially relevant to English teachers abroad who seem to be some of the worst offenders when it comes to not having an emergency fund and then when something bad happens, they post all over Facebook asking for donations But, an emergency fund is necessary! I don’t want to be all judgey because some of these people are totally legit; I’ve actually donated a good amount of money to them over the years.…

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How to Buy Stocks: A Simple Explanation

how-to-buy-stocks

How to Buy Stocks: Explained Simply  I get a lot of questions from my friends and readers of this blog who are new to the investing world about how to buy stocks. There are a few options for buying stocks, but the one I like the best (by far) is using an online discount brokerage. You can go with a full-service brokerage, but they are far more expensive and also quite unnecessary. Full-service brokers help…

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Friends on a Budget: is it Possible?

Building Passive Income: 2 Main Factors 1. Living frugally so that you have more money to invest in things like dividend paying stocks. 2. Putting the time in to develop the passive income streams through building websites, books, Iherb, Amazon, etc. Going Out in South Korea Usually Involves Drinking Living in South Korea as an expat (I’m originally from Canada), one of the things that frustrates me is that “going out” usually involves hitting up…

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