What Would you Do With $80,000, Updated!

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An Update on What to Do With My Pool of Money A couple months ago, I talked about a few different options for what I was going to do with the pool of money I’d accumulated from teaching English abroad in South Korea (for all the details about teaching in Korea, see my other blog: My Life! Teaching in a Korean University). For the original post, see: What Would you Do With $80,000? In the blog…

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What would you do with $80,000?

What would you do with $80,000?

What Would you do With $80,000? I talked recently about how I have quite a large amount of money coming my way soon as I’m finishing up my time teaching abroad in Korea. Pension payouts, housing deposit, etc, combined with the best exchange rate for Korean Won—>Canadian Dollars in a decade means that I’ll have roughly $90,000 come March 2016. Since I’m ridiculously frugal, and am living for free on a farm when I move…

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The Minimum Amount to Begin Investing

A short video about why I recommend people save up at least $10,000 in order to get started with ETF or dividend stock investing. For some solid investing advice, check out Steve Peasley’s book: Above Average Investing for the Average Investor. It’s one of my favorites for giving you the goods about investing, minus all the hype and fluff.

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Why Investing in Bonds is a Terrible Idea Right Now

A short video explaining why now (May 2015) is a terrible time to be investing in bond mutual funds or bond ETFs: For some solid advice, check out this book from Peter Lynch, one of the giants in the investing world: One Up On Wall Street: How To Use What You Already Know To Make Money In

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Trading vs. Investing

trading vs. investing

A short video about trading vs. investing and which one I recommend. For some solid advice on investing from one of the greats, check out: The Little Book of Common Sense Investing by John Bogle.

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Scared of the Stock Market? You should be Scared of Inflation

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I’ve recently created a series of short YouTube videos about personal finance. I hope you’ll find them helpful and if you have questions you want me to answer, or tips about how to make them better, please let me know. I’m very new to the YouTube world. Here’s the first one explaining how most people are scared of the stock market, but what they actually should be far more scared of is inflation. If you’re…

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What about Investing in Gold and Silver?

My Old Coworker’s Obsession I remember a few years ago when I worked with a couple guys who were obsessed with buying gold and silver. They were totally and completely convinced that stockpiling these two assets, physically was the best way to put their hard-earned dollars to work. I remember thinking that this seemed like a complicated endeavor because you had to go buy the product and hope you were not getting ripped off, then you…

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Why I Don’t Like Mutual Funds

I was happy to see that Andrew Hallam in his book, The Global Expatriate’s Guide to Investing: From Millionaire Teacher to Millionaire Expat dislikes mutual funds as much as I do. It actually surprises me that more financial gurus, such as Dave Ramsey (from The Total Money Makeover) don’t jump off the mutual fund bandwagon and onto the index investing or dividend stock investing one. Anyway, mutual funds are a pretty terrible investment choice especially…

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Am I Worried About Losing All My Money in a Stock Market Crash?

I was talking with a friend yesterday and she was asking how much money I can gain or lose in a single day and if I was worried about a stock market crash, or not. Short Answer: I can gain or lose $3000 or $4000 or even more in a single day and I’m not worried about it. Here’s why: the gains or losses in my portfolio are not actually real gains or losses because…

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Book Review. The Global Expatriate’s Guide to Investing: From Millionaire Teacher to Millionaire Expat

Disclaimer: I was sent a free copy of this book by Andrew Hallam, The Global Expatriate’s Guide to Investing: From Millionaire Teacher to Millionaire Expat in exchange for reviewing it on this blog. Overall, I really enjoyed it and would recommend it to any expat looking to get into the investing arena and do it right the first time, instead of through trial and error and losing a lot of money in the process. I…

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What I’m Buying: Energy Stocks

I normally like to have around $20 000-40 000 invested on the margin (money borrowed from my broker), which I can get at a really low interest rate (1.62% for the first $100 000 with Interactive Brokers) and then invested in dividend paying stocks that pay 3-5%, which leaves me with a nice profit of around 1-3% (after taxes) on that money. Except lately the markets have been going up and up and I’ve been…

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What if the Stock Market Crashes?

US stocks are flying high lately, with the S&P 500 and the Dow Jones Industrial Average hitting record highs. I just checked my portfolio and was shocked to discover that I’d just made $7000 US in the past 30 days. Now, I’m under no illusion that these are “actual” gains because what goes up, must come down. Here’s what I do to prepare for the inevitable. I like to have at least 5 or 6…

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It’s always time to buy stocks

If you’ve been following this blog, you know that I’ve been wavering in indecision about what to do with my excess cash. Sitting on it earning 1% interest is a terrible option because I’m actually losing money due to inflation and I can earn more than that on basically all of the stocks that I own because of the dividend, no matter what the actual stock price is. And you’d also know that I eventually…

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Paralyzed by Indecision? Automate your Life

I was listening to the Motley Fool Money podcast from Oct. 10, 2014 and for the interview they had on Daniel Levitin talking about his book on organization. Listen to the podcast for all the details, but what I got out of it was this: Life is overloaded with decisions and it’s easy to become paralyzed and end up not making any decisions, or bad decisions. The way to avoid this is to automate our…

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Some of my favorite dividend paying stocks

When you invest in dividend paying stocks, you invest like an old lady. It’s considered one of the most conservative ways that you could invest in individual stocks and in order to be effective, it has to be done over the very long-term. 10 years would be the absolute minimum I’d recommend and “forever” is even better. The hope is that I’ll eventually just be able to live well off the dividends I receive and…

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Sunk Costs

Sunk cost is an interesting concept to think about and can actually be applied to many areas of life. It economic terms, it’s a past cost that has already been lost and can’t be recovered. In investing, people (including me!) often make mistakes, but the true mistake is letting emotions get involved and not being able to handle sunk costs well. For example. I bought 10 shares of XYZ company at $100 on an insider…

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Investing in Marijuana Stocks

One of my friends recently asked me what I thought of marijuana stocks and if they would be a good investment. It was a good question since marijuana is now legal in some American states and the market will probably be expanding quite rapidly, especially if other states follow suit and legalize it. There’s definitely money to be made, but my answer was, “No, not now” and here are my reasons: 1. There likely isn’t…

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High-yield = High-quality?

A mistake that beginning investors often make is going to a stock screener like Finviz and then simply searching for the stocks with the highest dividend yields, which in some cases are 10 or even 20%. If you buy shares of a certain stock worth $2000, it seems pretty fabulous to get dividends worth $200 (10% yield) or $400 (20% yield) every year. It seems like you’re make our original money back in 5 or…

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